Tue, Oct 23, 2018

Groinal greetings all,
it seems vagina knitter Casey Jenkins has been causing a bit of a storm with her womanly weaving.

Casey Jenkins

Recently we reported the crotch controversy on the Urabukkake Blog (click here for the article and video). Jenkins has stuffed a ball of wool into her vadge and decided to publicly knit a scarf out of it over 28 days. And that meant for several days she was  dying the wool scarlet with her period. Provocative and not surprisingly some people have been grossed out. In the article below the vagina knitter defends her menstrual masterpiece.

Semen Simon


Above photo credit: Mark Burban


I’m The ‘Vaginal Knitting’ Perfomance Artist – And I Want To Defend My Work

Casey Jenkins

As an artist, of course I do seek attention – I want to express and communicate ideas, and refuse to feel compunction for that. Even in the face of criticism, I will make no apologies for my art

A couple of years ago, three separate friends told me that they’d dreamt of me the previous night. My cameo appearances weren’t spectacular (in my friend Meg’s dream, I was cast as a taxation specialist) but the coincidence struck me as poignant. That ephemeral images of me had floated unbidden into three distinct dream worlds made me feel, somehow, that I existed more solidly in this one.

Over the past two weeks, over 3.5m people have watched the YouTube clip shot by SBS2 documenting my 28 day performance piece, Casting Off My Womb, at Darwin’s DVAA. The short clip, which SBS2 titled Vaginal Knitting, gives an overview of the work in which I used skeins of wool lodged in my vaginal tunnel to knit a long passage, marking one full menstrual cycle.

My image and work have been consumed, contemplated and commented on by millions across the globe. It’s interesting then, and gives an insight into the performance’s heart, that all of this electronic crackle and buzz has not altered my identification with it at all. My image and imagery of my work has zipped through minds from Nigeria to Taiwan to Finland yet, in many ways, the personal impact has been less than the dreams of a few friends that I felt marked me more firmly into existence.

The response to the clip was immediate, massive and, for the most part, negative, marked with fear and repulsion. The word “ick” features heavily, as do “eww”, “gross” and “whyyyy?”. Exclamation points are afforded entire comment boxes, broken only by the odd question mark. Everything comes in for criticism; the menstrual blood used in the work probably cops the most, but viewers have taken swipes at my hair-cut, my eyebro